German 12cm Granatwerfer 42 mortar (green) - WW II

Produktnummer: E60074G
Hersteller: DiD

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Produktinformationen "German 12cm Granatwerfer 42 mortar (green) - WW II"

WWII German 12cm Granatwerfer 42 mortar (green) - in 1/6 scale


The 12 cm Granatwerfer 42 (literally, "grenade thrower Model 42"; official designation: 12 cm GrW 42) was a mortar used by Germany during World War II.(C) Wikipedia


The product is for historic education purposes only and is not intended to glorify, nor exploit the horrors and atrocities of war.


Text from DiD:

Green German 12cm Granatwerfer 42 Mortar (metal+resin)

Green mortar shell X 3 (metal+resin)

Green mortar shell carrier (metal+wood+webbing)


E60074G part list:

1 Green German 12cm Granatwerfer 42 Mortar (metal + resin)

2 Green mortar shell x3  (metal + resin)

3 Green mortar shell carrier (metal + wood + webbing)


NOTE: Figures NOT included

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